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Tuning Your Monitors To Your Room

After all we’ve done to ensure that our mix doesn’t overload our stereo buss and to ensure that we’re listening at the right levels, no matter what we listen on, you might think we’ve done all we can to give ourselves the best chance of turning out a creditable mix.  Sadly, that’s not the case.  There’s one huge issue we have to overcome – the acoustic imperfections of our listening environment.  We want to be sure that we’re listening to a true, uncoloured representation of our mix from out flat-response monitor speakers, yet the room we are working in has its own character that will flatter the bass and suck out the treble, meaning the killer mix we are hearing sounds thin and tinny on earbuds or car speakers, or sounds thuddy and dull.  In this video, I look at how I’ve tackled that in my small home studio, using the first of two separate plug-ins from different manufacturers, this time focused on correcting my monitors for the room I’m listening in.

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Gain Staging: Setting Monitoring Levels, Part 2

In the last few videos, I’ve looked at the steps I’ve taken to try to ensure that the gain structure of my mixes is such that I have plenty of headroom when I’m mixing, without running the risk of clipping the master output buss all the time. That’s all well and good, but it’s easy to undermine all that good work when your single emerges into the real world and has to ride the Fletcher Munson curves.  Setting a predictable level in your studio so that you know what is too quiet and too loud is as important as not overdriving your output bus.  Equally important is knowing that what you’re hearing is the same volume whether it’s on different speakers or headphones, so that you don’t kid yourself into thinking your mix has improved when it’s just got louder.  With that in mind, (and a handy little app for your phone), here’s how I set up my studio.